Phase II – Blueprints

Turning your bold smart grid initiative ideas into reality.

In Phase I of SEPA’s smart grid initiative, we received submissions from a wide variety of stakeholders across the electric power industry on their vision of innovative, tangible smart energy market designs and business models that work for all stakeholders. The goal of Phase II is to turn these visions into functional roadmaps that provide real world platforms that will move us to turn these bold ideas into a reality. These roadmaps show how we get from “here to there” with steps to move the electricity market forward. Varied in approach, view the roadmap summaries or jump right into these roadmaps below.

Blueprints
Submitted by: Vermont Energy Investment Corporation w/Regulatory Assistance Project
Vermont Solar Pathway: From a Developed to an Advanced Solar Economy

Vermont Solar Pathway: From a Developed to an Advanced Solar Economy

Submitted by: Vermont Energy Investment Corporation w/Regulatory Assistance Project

This roadmap illustrates how, Vermont, a state with low solar insolation, will become an “advanced solar economy.” Among the requirements for this process are: fixing the price signals, supporting prosumers and reforming rate designs. To get the price signals right, the Vermont Energy Investment Corporation recommend that externalities be factored into costs and that time-of-use rates be implemented. Along with TOU rates, 51st State citizens would face a system cost for DER integration. Citizens would be provided real-time information that reveals investment opportunities and these system costs. The utility would be forced to plan for the integration of DERs. VEIC discusses other regulations in the 51st State in great detail and lists them according to level of constraint.

Blueprints
Submitted by: various

51st State Phase II – All Roadmaps to the Future as Zip

Submitted by: various

SEPA’s 51st State Inititiative (sepa51.org) provides a collaborative dialogue across the power sector to discuss the future of the electric industry. The initiative’s goal of the second phase was to move from exploring the big picture concepts and theories presented during Phase I to the development of specific roadmaps that show how we get from ‘here’ to ‘there’. The aim is not to find one single path forward toward any one specific 51st State model, but to discover many paths that can work for a variety of states or market conditions that are all headed in the same general direction. This is the collection of the 14 ‘roadmaps’ from a variety of perspectives, including Siemens, Union of Concerned Scientists, American Public Power Association, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, ScottMadden, Inc., Accenture, Vermont Energy Investment Coporation, PSEG, Arizona Public Service among other esteemed individuals and organizations.

Blueprints
Submitted by: American Public Power Association
APPA’s Roadmap to the 51st State

APPA’s Roadmap to the 51st State

Submitted by: American Public Power Association

In this paper, APPA identifies first steps to a sustainable future for public power utilites, including business practice changes, rate design strategies, plus community education and ancillary services. This paper begins with a profile of public power utilities, detailing their resource profiles, customer characteristics as well as service and rate design practices. It discusses design flaws that caused electric restructuring to fall short of expectations over the last 20 years. It uses lessons learned from past decisions to develop a grid modernization plan. APPA’s 51st State would stress risk management, allowing DERs to be deployed based on value added to the grid. To fix price signals, it would reflect real costs in rates and product offerings. Information would be key for utilties and customers in the 51st State. To determine DER value, utilities would need to map alternative power supply options frequently. Information communiction technologies would also be necessary to communicate investment opporutinites and services in the utility’s a la carte menu.

Blueprints
Submitted by: Arizona Public Service Company
Rates, Responsibility and Reliability in the 51st State

Rates, Responsibility and Reliability in the 51st State

Submitted by: Arizona Public Service Company

Arizona Public Service (APS) recognizes that there is a growing dislocation between an efficient distribution system and the financial motives of utilities. Though, it insists that the vertically integrated utility business model would be the most efficient way to serve customers in the 51st State due to overall system visibility and flexibility facilitated by centralized control. However, APS proposes change in rate design, specifically, it reccomends a time-off-use component to best reflect utility costs and allow customers to actively participate in the market for electricity. Of course, this change in rate design requires investment in electronic devices to allow information gathering and better communication with customers. APS discusses a series of platforms for customer outreach and education including smart video, service chat and customized messaging.

Blueprints
Submitted by: Black & Veatch Sponsored by Southern Maryland Electric Cooperative (SMECO)
Integrating Solar DG into the 21st Century Electric Utility

Integrating Solar DG into the 21st Century Electric Utility

Submitted by: Black & Veatch Sponsored by Southern Maryland Electric Cooperative (SMECO)

This paper develops a framework for flexible regulatory, technological and market policies to allow for a smooth transition from today’s grid to something that more similarly represents the grid in the 51st State. SMECO’s (written by Black & Veatch) 51st State would mold to the mixed monopoly and comptetive service model by unbundling rates to allow customers to choose their services. Though, the 51st State would retain demand charges to ensure cost recovery. Flexibility would also be achieved in interconnection policies so that there is different treatment to DERs that are cost saving and cost causing. For SMECO, flexibility is the key element for utilties and customers to produce long term benefits and create a least cost solution fro DER integration.

Blueprints
Submitted by: Baker Street Publishing and TeMIx, Inc.
Sustainable Business and Regulatory Model: Transactive Energy

Sustainable Business and Regulatory Model: Transactive Energy

Submitted by: Baker Street Publishing and TeMIx, Inc.

This paper presents a framework for introducing a “transactive energy” business model in California. Under this model, all parties would autonomously engage in forward transactions to coordinate investments and in spot transactions to coordinate operating decisions. This model would also apply to the market for transportation in California, where electric vehicles are achieveing high penetrations. Utilities would remain as a transport service providers and could become energy service providers, but would face competition from third parties. A stewardship board would implement policy, set deadlines and facilitate public participation.

Blueprints
Submitted by: Andrew Bray
Transformation to the 51st State: Incorporating New Technologies and Achieving New Goals

Transformation to the 51st State: Incorporating New Technologies and Achieving New Goals

Submitted by: Andrew Bray

Andrew Bray’s future state system would incorporate clean power generation into Bonbright’s ratemaking goals. The compensation structure would be re-tooled to better align with those ratemaking goals. The utility would be transformed into an integrator of services that would be carried out by 3rd party companies. Thus, reducing the utility’s size. Many of these services would be offered in a competitive market, decreasing monopoly effects, investment risks, while adding flexibility and robustness. Increased implementation and use of smart meters and information sharing systems would allow customers to determine how they make use of the energy grid. Financial investments would flow freer due to increased availability of money and reduced risk. This system would be defined by its flexibility, empowerment of people, robustness, and autonomy.

Blueprints
Submitted by: Bruce Nordman of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
“The Fit Grid” — Principles for a better electric future

“The Fit Grid” — Principles for a better electric future

Submitted by: Bruce Nordman of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

This proposal describes the “Fit Grid” in the 51st State. The Fit Grid takes advantage of the rise in communications and network technology. All that would come from this fully automated gird would be electrons and prices. Utilities’ would dictate these prices and could provide ancillary services. However, regulators would set strict guidelines for rates and investments would require public approval. Rates would be dynamic and localized. Customers could arrange peer-to-peer settlements and participate in micro grids. Fewer investments on the utilities behalf would reduce costs and extra revenue could be shifted to other public needs to maximize societal benefit.

Blueprints
Submitted by: The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association
The Consumer-Centric Utility Future

The Consumer-Centric Utility Future

Submitted by: The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association

The consumer-centric utility is described in the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association’s paper. This utility is similar to today’s, managing everything from generation to distribution, while also offering customers ancillary services, including educational programs, community solar and behind the meter technologies such as batteries and electric water heaters. The consumer-centric utility integrates DERs into long term planning and uses simulation software to allow for actual incurred cost charges. Following the principle of cost causation, this utility promotes transparency in pricing and real-time data for customers. The utility of the future is committed to responding to consumer needs and local changes.

Blueprints
Submitted by: PSEG
A Roadmap to a Sustainable Energy Future

A Roadmap to a Sustainable Energy Future

Submitted by: PSEG

PSEG’s 51st State adopts the following priorities: reliability and resiliency, clean energy, universal access and affordable electricity. Aging infrastructure would be replaced by highly efficient or clean devices. Greater efficiencies would also be achieved by improving lighting, replacing old systems and caulking windows. These services are few of the many that utilities could provide. Rates would be decoupled so that customers could chose services. The utility would work with technology providers to help customers monitor use. Technology would also allow for situational awareness of the network at all times. Regulators would introduce performance-based rates to incentive utilities to maximize customer satisfaction in their new role as an “integrator of services.”

Blueprints
Submitted by: Scott Madden, Inc.
Leveraging the Natural Advantages of the Electric Utility

Leveraging the Natural Advantages of the Electric Utility

Submitted by: Scott Madden, Inc.

ScottMadden’s paper presents a five-stage process for transitioning into the future state. In stage 1, standards would be developed in data communication, grid operation and grid visibility. An exact methodology to valuing DERs and a process for linking DERs to the wholesale market would be developed in stage 2. Rates and regulations would be reformed in stage 3 so that charges would be based on value added to the grid and so that a cap is set on prosumer generation. In stage 4, modifications would be made to the utility business model. Here, the 51st State would implement automation technologies and pilot projects to test business models with these new technologies. The State would also identify utility-owned DER opportunities and, in the final stage, would incorporate DERs into long term grid planning.

Blueprints
Submitted by: Siemens
The Consumer Driven Grid: A Roadmap

The Consumer Driven Grid: A Roadmap

Submitted by: Siemens

This paper describes a future state where consumers would be empowered to make decisions in receiving and managing their electricity. This full empowerment would be achieved by increase in information, pricing choices and automation. The physical grid would be fully automated, allowing DERs to achieve high market penetration. Regulation would be updated to provide guidance and financial incentives to utilities to support the adoption of DERs. Rates would be decoupled and customers would receive notices showing their options on an annual basis. Information sharing is key in Siemens 51st State. Customers could share data with third parties who then could make proposals for their services. Utilities would be able to participate in the DER market as well, but would likely assume the role of a distribution system provider.

Blueprints
Submitted by: Strategic Utility Management LLC
The Highway Is Not the Destination: Notes from the 51st State Electric Regulatory Reform Task Force

The Highway Is Not the Destination: Notes from the 51st State Electric Regulatory Reform Task Force

Submitted by: Strategic Utility Management LLC

This paper presents a story within a story where an electricity reform task force is asked to present recommendations regarding grid modernization to the governor of the 51st State. They come up with four main suggestions – the first being to fix price signals by using time-of-use rates and avoiding monopoly power. Second, they urge the governor to remove restrictions on bilateral transactions or building across property lines and allow virtual private networks so that generation is closer to use. Third, they recommend imposing an externality tax to level the environmental playing field. And finally, they propose that utilities should tackle the intermittency challenge of DERs by making reliability a commodity.

Blueprints
Submitted by: The Union of Concerned Scientists
Reducing CO2 with electrification, TOU rates

Reducing CO2 with electrification, TOU rates

Submitted by: The Union of Concerned Scientists

The Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) envisions a future state with many opportunities for improved relationships and new partnerships. The utility would invite third-parties to create solutions to problems located between the itself and customers. This could involve anything from creating a user friendly customer service platform to selling batteries. There would be many programs to incentivize meeting environmental policy goals including electric heating rebates, feed-in-tariffs, cap and trade emission programs, plus renewable energy and energy efficiency standards. The 51st State would eventually adopt time-of-use rates with granular data and bill impact summaries for customers. This data would require new assets to facilitate a two-way network including AMI, in-home devices and volt/var control devices. UCS sees many opportunities for load control in the 51st State.

Blueprints
Submitted by: Accenture Management LLC
Accenture’s Perspective on the Digitally Enabled Grid of the Future

Accenture’s Perspective on the Digitally Enabled Grid of the Future

Submitted by: Accenture Management LLC

In Accenture’s 51st State, utility business models would dramtically change. Leveraging its expireince in planning and grid management, the utiltiy would assume the role of a Distribution Platform Optimizer (DPO), providing electricty to customers from a portfolio of distibution assets. These assets – distributed, central and/or renewable based – would allow the utility to meet evolving customer demands and ambitious environmental policy objectives, while maintiang a safe and reliable network. In its new role, the utility would no longer have an “obligation to serve”, but a “commitment ot optimize.” As an enabler, it would reduces its cost to serve and gain access to new earning mechnisms. Under Accenture’s model, the utility would be subject to value and outcome based contructs, prompting it to improve customer expirience and address environemntal concerns.

51st State Executive Leadership Council

Michael Champley

Former Comissioner, Hawaii Public Utilities Commission

x
Michael Champley

Mr. Champley was appointed commissioner to the Hawaii Public Utilities Commission (PUC) in September 2011 by Governor Neil Abercrombie. Commissioner Champley has over 40 years of experience analyzing, integrating and managing complex economic, public policy and technical issues facing the energy utility industry. Prior to his appointment, Commissioner Champley was a Maui-based senior energy consultant focused on clean energy resource integration in Hawaii.

Prior to re-locating to Hawaii, Commissioner Champley was a senior executive with DTE Energy, a major electric and gas energy company where he held various executive positions including Senior Vice President-Regulatory Affairs and Senior Vice President-Power Supply.

Commissioner Champley holds a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from the University of Dayton and a Master of Business Administration from Indiana University, with emphasis in Finance and Public Utility Economics and Regulation.

Steve Corneli

Principal, Strategies for Clean Energy Innovation

x
Steve Corneli

Steve Corneli is an independent advisor to companies and organizations on clean energy innovation, policies and strategies. He has worked in the power sector since 1990, focusing on the intersection of new technologies and business models with the key policy-making institutions of state and federal government. From 2001 to 2016, Steve served in various leadership roles at NRG Energy, including wholesale market design and advocacy, government and regulatory affairs, climate policy, and clean energy policy and strategy. Prior to NRG, Steve was a utility consumer advocate in the Minnesota Attorney General’s office and a regulatory specialist serving competitive power sector clients in the law firm of Leonard, Street and Deinard. Earlier in his career he managed a 600 acre family farm for more than a decade. Steve serves on the board of the Climate Action Reserve, the Executive Leadership Council of the Smart Electric Power Alliance’s 51st State initiative, RMI’s eLab Advisory Council, and has served on the board of the Solar Energy Industries Association and as a member of the Operating Committee of North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC). Steve has a MA in Public Affairs from the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey Institute, concentrating on energy, environment and technology policy, and a BA degree from St. John’s College.

Ralph Izzo

Chairman & CEO, PSE&G

x
Ralph Izzo

Ralph Izzo was elected Chairman and CEO of Public Service Enterprise Group Incorporated (PSEG) in April 2007. He was named as the company’s President and COO and a member of the board of directors of PSEG in October 2006. Previously, Mr. Izzo was President and COO of Public Service Electric and Gas Company (PSE&G). Since joining PSE&G in 1992, Mr. Izzo was elected to several executive positions within PSEG’s family of companies, including PSE&G Senior Vice President — Utility Operations, PSE&G Vice President — Appliance Service, PSE&G Vice President — Corporate pPlanning and PSE&G Vice President — Electric Ventures. In these capacities, he broadened his experience in the areas of general management, strategic planning and finance. Mr. Izzo is a well-known leader within the utility industry, as well as the public policy arena.

Mr. Izzo’s career began as a research scientist at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, performing numerical simulations of fusion energy experiments. He has published or presented over 35 papers on magnetohydrodynamic modeling.

Mr. Izzo received his Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees in mechanical engineering and his Doctor of Philosophy degree in applied physics from Columbia University. He also received a Master of Business Administration degree, with a concentration in finance from the Rutgers Graduate School of Management. He is listed in numerous editions of Who’s Who and has been the recipient of national fellowships and awards. Mr. Izzo has received Honorary Degrees from the New Jersey Institute of Technology (Doctor of Science), Thomas A. Edison State College (Doctor of Humane Letters), Bloomfield College (Doctor of Humane Letters), Rutgers University (Doctor of Humane Letters) and Raritan Valley Community College (Associate of Science).

Mr. Izzo serves as nominating committee chairman of the New Jersey Chamber of Commerce and is on the board of directors for The Williams Companies, the New Jersey Utilities Association, the Edison Electric Institute (EEI), the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) and The Center for Energy Workforce Development. He is also a member of the Board of Trustees of Peddie School, Columbia University School of Engineering Board of Visitors and the Princeton University Adlinger Center for Energy and the Environment Advisory Council, as well as a member of the Visiting Committee for the Department of Nuclear Engineering at MIT. Mr. Izzo is a former Chair of the Rutgers University Board of Governors and the New Jersey Chamber of Commerce.

Kenneth Munson

President & Co-Founder, Sunverge Energy

x
Kenneth Munson

Kenneth Munson is President and Co-Founder of Sunverge Energy, a leader in the emerging clean-tech market focused on smart grid optimization and energy storage services delivered via a cutting-edge software-as-a-service computing platform. Kenneth leads the company’s operations and is responsible for the company’s strategic development including new business initiatives, corporate financing and mergers and acquisitions activity. Kenneth also serves as Adjunct Lecturer at St. Mary’s College of California Graduate School of Economics and Business Administration (SEBA). There he teaches Entrepreneurial Finance and Managing Innovation with the focus of strategic management of technology.

Kenneth also serves on the Board of Directors for Safety Center, Inc. Prior to founding Sunverge, Kenneth was Vice President of Business Development and Marketing for Kinetek, Inc. — a subsidiary of Jordan Industries. He drove expansion of its motion control technologies group throughout the U.S., Asia and Europe by leading and supporting joint ventures, acquisitions and new product development efforts. Concurrently, Kenneth oversaw Kinetek’s global brand management strategy for its entire portfolio of companies. Kenneth holds an MBA from St. Mary’s College of California School of Economics and Business Administration (SEBA) in international finance and business administration and a bachelor’s degree in marketing communications from California State University, Sacramento.

Seth Frader-Thompson

President, EnergyHub, Board Secretary

x
Seth Frader-Thompson

Board: Secretary

Seth Frader-Thompson co-founded EnergyHub in 2007 and continues to serve as its President. Under his leadership, the company has become a leading provider of both utility-installed and Bring Your Own Thermostat demand response services. EnergyHub offers utilities end-to-end demand response program management, including program design, installation, marketing and customer support services, as well as EnergyHub’s Mercury software platform for device control, with the goal of enabling both utilities and consumers to benefit from participation in DR and DER programs. Simultaneously, EnergyHub works with the leading device manufacturers and home services companies to bring their customers into utility programs.

Seth is a frequent speaker on demand response and connected home issues and is a board member of the Association for Demand Response & Smart Grid. Prior to founding EnergyHub, Seth served in several managerial and technical roles at Honeybee Robotics. During his tenure at Honeybee Robotics, he worked on robotics projects for NASA and developed bomb-disposal robots for the military. He was the principal investigator for a DARPA research effort to build a miniature laser vision system for search and rescue robots.
Seth has a bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Colorado, where his research focused on Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) for Ultracold Atom Optics.

Ron Binz

Principal, Public Policy Consulting

x
Ron Binz

Board: Director

Ron Binz is a Principal at Public Policy Consulting, specializing in energy and telecommunications economics and policy issues. On June 27, 2013, President Obama nominated Ron to become Chairman of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, but following a confirmation hearing in a U.S. Senate committee, he asked the president to withdraw his name from further consideration. He was appointed by Colorado Governor Bill Ritter to the Colorado Public Utilities Commission in January 2007 and served until April 2011. As Chairman, Ron led the Colorado PUC in implementing the many policy changes championed by the Governor and the Legislature to bring forward Colorado’s “New Energy Economy.”

Ron was an active member of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, serving as Chair of NARUC’s Task Force on Climate Policy and as a member of both the Energy Resources and Environment Committee and the International Affairs Committee. From 1984 to 1995, Ron directed the Colorado Office of Consumer Counsel, the state’s utility consumer advocate. His office represented residential, small business and agricultural utility consumers before the Colorado Public Utilities Commission, federal regulatory agencies and the courts. While Consumer Counsel, Ron served as President of the National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates (NASUCA).

Ron received a bachelor’s degree in philosophy from St. Louis University and a master’s degree in mathematics from the University of Colorado.

Lisa Frantzis

Senior Vice President, Advanced Energy Economy

x
Lisa Frantzis

Lisa Frantzis is a Senior VP at Advanced Energy Economy (AEE), a national business association whose mission is to transform policy to ensure a more secure, clean and affordable energy system throughout the U.S. At AEE, she leads an initiative to accelerate the transition to a 21st Century Electricity System. The two primary activities of the initiative are:

  1. CEO Forums/Public Utility Commission (PUC) Forums that convene utility executives, PUC Commissioners and advanced energy companies to develop a vision for reform that is responsive to the needs of each state and drives towards concrete action.
  2. Participation in key regulatory proceedings where AEE develops joint positions with its members, provides analysis for justification of these positions and assists in implementation plans.

Lisa served as a Managing Director in Navigant Consulting’s Energy Practice since 2002, responsible for leading the renewable and distributed energy business. Prior to Navigant, she consulted at Arthur D. Little for 23 years in energy efficiency and clean energy. Over her 35 years of consulting experience, she has identified energy program options for international government agencies, determined renewable energy integration options for utility companies, developed business strategies for clean energy manufacturers and conducted due diligence for financial firms considering clean energy investments.

Lisa is currently on the Board of Directors of the New England Clean Energy Council (NECEC) and previously on the boards of three other organizations: the American Council on Renewable Energy (ACORE), the Solar Energy Business Association of New England (SEBANE) and the Solar Electric Power Association (SEPA).

John Di Stasio

President, Large Public Power Council

x
John Di Stasio

John Di Stasio joined the Large Public Power Council (LPPC) in August 2014. The LPPC represents the 26th largest consumer-owned utilities in the United States. Di Stasio serves as the Association’s President, based in Washington DC, representing the interests of the member organizations.

Di Stasio was formerly the General Manager and CEO of the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) from June of 2008 through April of 2014. Di Stasio is the past president of both the Northwest Public Power Association and the California Municipal Utility Association and the vice chair of the Large Public Power Council. He was also a board member of the Business Council for Sustainable Energy and the American Public Power Association. He was a member of the North American Electric Reliability Corporation’s Members Representative Committee.

Di Stasio was also a gubernatorial appointee to the California Workforce Investment Board. He was the Electric Light and Power Large Utility CEO of the Year in 2013. Di Stasio was also active in international energy issues in other countries including Bangladesh, Brazil, Botswana, India and Jordan. He was named Volunteer of the Year in 2013 by the United States Energy Association. He is a graduate of the University of San Francisco and a Senior Fellow of the American Leadership Forum.

Di Stasio is a native Californian and fourth generation farmer. He is the owner of Di Stasio Vineyards, a commercial vineyard in Amador County, California. Di Stasio enjoys foreign travel, golf, fishing and Amador Zinfandels.

Kelly Speakes-Backman

Senior Vice President of Policy & Research, The Alliance to Save Energy

x
Kelly Speakes-Backman

Kelly Speakes-Backman is Senior Vice President of Policy and Research at the Alliance to Save Energy. She is a former Commissioner of the Maryland Public Service Commission, who has spent more than 20 years working on energy and environmental issues in the public and private sectors. She earned a Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering from Boston University.

Mark Vanderhelm

Vice President of Energy, Walmart

x
Mark Vanderhelm

Joining Walmart in 2015 as Vice President of Energy, Mark Vanderhelm leads the team supporting Walmart U.S., including Retail Energy, Energy Regulation and Management, Energy Services and Energy Development. He oversees the company’s global commitment to energy efficiency, sustainability and renewable energy.

Mark joins the company from Exelon Generation, LLC in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, where he managed Generation and Renewables Development. In this role, Mark led the team responsible for developing new generation projects (gas, solar, biomass, storage and hydro) and investing in new electricity-based technologies throughout the U.S. and Canada. In previous roles, he led business development for the retail team, as well as the wholesale origination team focused on the Southern U.S. Throughout these roles, Mark directed due diligence and negotiation for key growth projects for the organization. Mark holds a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from University of Texas. He went on to earn a master’s degree and doctorate in nuclear engineering from MIT, where he co-directed the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations’ Reactor Technology Course for Utility Executives.

Joe Slater

President & CEO, Southern Maryland Electric Cooperative

x
Joe Slater

Joe Slater is the President & CEO of Southern Maryland Electric Cooperative, one of the largest in the nation, with $500 million in revenue, $1-billion in assets and 160,000 member-customers. He was appointed to that position in 2002. SMECO has 525 employees and a 15-member Board. He previously held the position of CFO with SMECO for 15 years.

Slater holds a MBA in finance from George Washington University, a bachelor’s degree from Shepherd University in accounting, and an associate’s degree from the College of Southern Maryland (CSM). He has extensive leadership experience in the electric cooperative industry and was formerly Vice President with the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association. He was also CEO of Tideland Electric Membership Corporation in North Carolina. He has held the position of Chairman of the Maryland Chamber of Commerce, Chairman of the Southern Maryland Workforce Investment Board and Chairman of the board of Trustees of the College of Southern Maryland (CSM).

He currently serves as a director for: Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond (Baltimore Branch), Community Bank of the Chesapeake, CSM Foundation, University of Maryland Charles Regional Medical Center and is active in many civic and community organizations. Additionally, Slater serves on several industry-specific boards, including Chairman of ACES Power Marketing and the founding Secretary of the National Renewables Cooperative Organization.

Steve Malnight

Senior Vice President, Strategy and Policy, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Board Past-Chair

x
Steve Malnight

Board: Past-Chair

Steve Malnight is the Senior Vice President of Strategy and Policy for Pacific Gas and Electric Company. He is responsible for strategy; policy; grid integration and innovation; local, state and federal government affairs; and community relations. He also is responsible for energy procurement.

Steve joined PG&E in 2002 and has held diverse leadership positions within the company. After serving as Director of Customer Strategy and then Senior Director of Finance, leading the company’s budgeting and planning process, he became Special Assistant to the Chairman of PG&E’s Corporation in 2007. Subsequent roles included Vice President of Renewable Energy and Vice President of Customer Energy Solutions, an organization providing integrated energy solutions to help customers save energy and money. He was appointed Senior Vice President, Regulatory Affairs in September 2014. In this role, Steve was responsible for developing, coordinating and managing policy with state and federal regulatory agencies, including the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC), the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). He also developed and filed rate proposals with the CPUC and provided oversight of the company’s gas and electric tariffs.

Steve serves as Chairman of the Board of the SEPA. He also serves on the Board of Advisors for The Salvation Army of Alameda County, a non-profit organization committed to serving families in crisis. Steve holds a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from the University of Notre Dame and an MBA from the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth.

Frank Prager

Vice President of Policy & Federal Affairs, Xcel Energy Inc.

x
Frank Prager

Frank Prager is Vice President of Policy and Federal Affairs at Xcel Energy Inc., a U.S. investor-owned electricity and natural gas company with regulated operations in eight Midwestern and Western states. Frank leads an organization that is responsible for representing the company before Congress and various federal agencies. His organization designs and advocates for federal and state policies related to a number of utility issues, including the environment, climate change, renewable energy, state and federal regulation, energy markets, tax, transmission and emerging technologies. Frank is a graduate of the University of Colorado, where he received degrees in chemical engineering and English. He also earned his law degree from Stanford University.

Ben Bixby

General Manager of Energy & Enterprise Partnerships, Nest Labs

x
Ben Bixby

Ben Bixby is the general manager of energy and enterprise partnerships at Nest Labs, where he steers new product and global business development with energy and enterprise partners. Ben came to Nest in early 2013 when Nest acquired MyEnergy, the venture-backed energy data technology company he founded in 2007 and led as its CEO — and which now powers a number of Nest’s energy data capabilities. Ben earned his Bachelor of Science from Georgetown University. Together with his wife and son, he resides in Boston and Palo Alto — fiercely supporting the Red Sox from both coasts.

Anne Pramagglore

President & CEO, ComEd

x
Anne Pramagglore

Anne Pramaggiore is President and CEO of ComEd, an electric utility company delivering electricity to 3.8 million customers in Chicago and Northern Illinois. Pramaggiore joined ComEd in 1998 to work on the company’s transition to competitive energy markets under the Illinois Consumer Choice Law of 1997. In her role as ComEd’s lead lawyer and as head of Regulatory Policy, she led major policy work around the restructuring of the Illinois electric industry.

In 2009, Pramaggiore was appointed as ComEd’s COO and became responsible for overseeing day-to-day operations on the electric grid and in customer operations. In that role, she led the company’s effort to set the legislative framework for ComEd’s smart grid build-out, a leading model nationally for modernizing one of the largest utility systems in the country. She is the first female to hold the post of President and CEO at the electric utility. Pramaggiore serves as a board member of Chicago Federal Reserve Board, Motorola Solutions, Inc., and several civic and community organizations. She is a 1989 graduate of DePaul University School of Law and served as editor-in-chief of the school’s Law Review. She has a bachelor’s degree in communications and theater from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.

Adam Umanoff

Executive Vice President & General Counsel, Edison International

x
Adam Umanoff

Adam Umanoff is Executive Vice President and General Counsel for Edison International, the parent company of Southern California Edison. He is responsible for the legal affairs of the company. Prior to joining Edison International in January 2015, Umanoff was a partner at Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld, LLP, an international law firm, where he co-chaired the firm’s global project finance practice. He focused on the development, financing, operation, disposition and acquisition of infrastructure and energy projects and companies, with a particular focus on the renewable energy industry.

Prior to joining Akin Gump, Umanoff was a partner at several international law firms, an independent renewable energy consultant and he served as President and CEO of Enron Wind Corporation, one of the world’s largest renewable energy developers and wind turbine manufacturers (now part of GE). He has been recognized as one of California’s Top 100 Lawyers and Top 25 Clean Tech Lawyers. Mr. Umanoff is a member of the American Bar Association, Business Law Section and the Los Angeles County Bar Association. He received his Bachelor of Science from Cornell University in 1980 and his J.D. in 1983 from Columbia Law School where he was editor of the Columbia Journal of Environmental Law, a Harlan Fiske Stone Scholar and the recipient of the Wertheimer Prize in Labor Law.